These species occur in Britain and are likely to arrive on the island of Ireland at some point in the coming years. They might even already be here and just not recorded yet. Please keep an eye out and email a photograph if you think you’ve spotted them

 

Anthophora plumipes (Hairy-footed flower-bee)

       

Information:

  • Has not been recorded from Ireland to date – can you be the first to find it here?
  • Common and widespread in much of England and Wales, especially in towns, cities and villages.
  • Large bumblebee sized species
  • The female resembles a small, black bumblebee with orange-red hairs on the hind leg. 
  • The male has extensive yellow markings on its face and a very long fringe of hairs along the lower half of it’s middle leg.
  • Often one of the first bees to emerge from hibernation in Britain where it is found from early March to late May.
  • Often nests in the soft mortar in old walls. Occasionally it will nest on bare clay on the ground.
  • Will visit a range of flowers but particularly likes Lungwort
  • It will be necessary to submit a specimen with the first Irish record.
  • BWARS information on Anthophora plumipes

 

Ivy Bee (Colletes hederae)

Ivy bee_Steven Falk

 

 

 

 

 

Information:

  • Has not been recorded from Ireland to date – can you be the first to find it here?
  • Was recorded as new to Britain in 2001. Has since spread across much of southern England and into south Wales, where it is now extremely plentiful in some coastal localities.
  • Peak activity matches the flowering period of its key pollen forage plant, Ivy
  • Very late flight period. It is the last solitary bee to emerge each year and is on the wing from early September until early November.
  • Honeybee sized but with clear pale bands on the abdomen
  • Look for the bee on large stands of flowering Ivy.
  • It will be necessary to submit a specimen with the first Irish record.
  • BWARS information on Colletes hederae